Macroeconomic policies and structural transformation: exchange rate management

Background

The central features of what Economic’growth – the’sustained’increase’in’productivity’and’living’standards’– is a’ target’of’ many’ economic’ policy’ makers. Kuznets’ (1973)’ sates’ structural’ transformation’ as’ one’ of’ the’ main’features’of’modern’economic’growth.’Structural’ transformation’involves’a’change’in’ the’ distribution of’employment’and’production’across’various’sectors’of’the’economy.’ Much’recent’literature’has’demonstrated’that’economic’development’requires’structural’change’ from’ low’ productivity’ activities’ to’ high’ productivity’ activities.’ It’ also’ suggests’ that’ the’ industrial’sector’in’general’and’the’manufacturing’sector’in’particular’is’the’engine’of’economic’ growth.’ In’ fact,’ virtually’ all’ cases’ of’ high,’ rapid,’ and’ sustained’ economic’ growth’ in’ modern’ economic’ development’ have’ been’ associated’ with’ industrialisation,’ particularly’ growth’ in’ manufacturing’production'(see’Szirmai'(2009)).